Creative Insight and Inspiration…

How To Be Creative | Off Book | PBS Digital Studios

Kirby Ferguson: Embrace the Remix – Ted Talk, video, 09:42
Nothing is original, says Kirby Ferguson, creator of Everything is a Remix.
From Bob Dylan to Steve Jobs, he says our most celebrated creators borrow, steal and transform.

 

GALLERIES

CHALLENGE 1 | CHALLENGE 2 | CHALLENGE 3

Nikon D5 DSLR released on January 6, 2016.

ART 235 Photo Imaging: Creative Workflow

Creative Workflow is the foundation course for all newly declared photography majors, introducing students to the art of photographic imaging and digital asset management. Students will be working with DSLR cameras and professional level image-editing and management applications while exploring their limitless creative potential and focusing on their intellectual development.

Prerequisite: ART 103 2D Process

Adobe Creative Cloud logo.

Adobe® Creative Cloud™

Adobe Creative Cloud, is a monthly membership (subscription) that gives you the entire collection of CC tools and more. Love print? Interested in websites and iPad apps? Ready to edit video? You can do it all. Plus, Creative Cloud members automatically get access to new products and exclusive updates as soon as they’re released. And, with 20 GB of cloud storage and the ability to sync to any device, your files are always right where you need them.

Creative Cloud Photography Plan for those who just want Photoshop & Lightroom

 

 

Apple Photos for macOS icon.

Migrate your Apple Aperture or Photos Library into Lightroom

Schedule at a glance (subject to revision)

February

03 Introduction: overview of course and materials.


10Lecture/Presentation: historical overview of photographic imaging. Equipment check: bring computer, hardware and software. Getting started with Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 (version 18). Investigate digital imaging fundamentals and various image editing techniques.

17Lecture/Presentation: overview of photographic imaging. Equipment check: bring computer, camera, manual and hardware & software. Getting started with your camera and basic operations. Discuss exposure: ISO, apertures (ƒ/stops) & shutter speed. Discuss shooting modes. Begin shooting and camera exploration.

24 Lecture/Presentation/Challenge One: bring equipment, Getting started with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC (version 6.x). Adding metadata to images. Non-destructive image editing. Individual critiques. Shooting in manual mode.

March

03Lecture/Presentation/Challenge Two: bring equipment, Adobe Lightroom. Continue working with the Develop module. Investigate retouching in Lightroom and Photoshop. Discuss exposure bracketing and more about shooting. Individual instruction & critiques.

10Lecture/Presentation/Challenge Three: bring equipment, Adobe Lightroom. Continue working with the Develop module. Investigate retouching in Lightroom and Photoshop. Discuss lens types (wide-angle, normal, telephoto and specialty glass) and more about shooting. Printing demo in CA4006 Print Center.

17Midterm – Critique/Project One Due: bring equipment, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. Working with your cameras and aperture-priority mode to explore depth of field. Individual instruction & critiques.

24Spring Break: enjoy! the Holiday and keep shooting!


31Critique/Project Two Due: bring equipment, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. Working with your cameras and shutter-priority shooting mode to capture motion. Presentation on the power of cropping imagery. Discuss shooting video and file formats. Individual instruction & critiques.

April

07Critique/Project Three Due: bring equipment, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. Portrait photography: investigate shooting portraits and various lighting set ups. Individual instruction & critiques.

14Lecture/Lab/Challenge Four: bring equipment, Adobe Photoshop & Lightroom. Continue working with techniques. Printing demo in CA4006. Individual instruction & critiques.

21Critique/Project Four Due: bring equipment, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. Individual instruction & critiques.

28Lecture/Lab/Critique/Project Five Due: exploring the Book module in Lightroom. Discuss layout and publishing services. Investigate typography in Adobe Photoshop. Individual instruction & critiques.

May

05Lecture/Lab: exploring the Slideshow and Web modules in Lightroom. Discuss publishing services and merits of social media. Individual instruction & critiques.

12Lab: continue exploring the Book, Slideshow and Web modules in Lightroom. Individual instruction & critiques. Bring in any borrowed equipment that needs to be returned to the University.

19 Final Exam 12:30 – 2:30 pm: thanks for participating in ART 235, enjoy your Summer and keep shooting!

Notes & Projects

Illustration of multiple photographs composited together.

Taking Photographs

Students begin taking photographs (shooting) on the third day of class and capture images throughout the semester. It's really easy to shoot thousands of digital images for this course.

Digital images are date and time stamped upon creation and may be reviewed anytime class is in session, including critiques. Image creation dates will be examined for contiguity and will contribute to the student's final grade.


Shooting Dos & Presentation Don'ts

check markDo shoot (take a photograph of) everything and anything, anywhere and anytime. The more you shoot and think about photography, the more you will learn and the better you will become. All subject matter can be presented for individual critiques.

  • photograph people, places & things
  • photograph day & night
  • photograph light & shadows
  • photograph personal interests
  • photograph your stuff
  • photograph your world

A few more ideas about what to shoot…

  • photograph time
  • photograph weather
  • photograph motion
  • photograph emotions
  • photograph concepts
  • photograph desire
  • photograph passion
  • photograph dreams
  • photograph art
  • photograph life

 

prohibition symbolDon't present the following subject matter for project critiques. Photographs containing these subjects will not be discussed and will result with zero points for that project.

  • Babies & Pets – of any kind. We get it, they're cute!
  • Events – i.e. weddings, bar mitzvahs, little Johnny's birthday party, concerts, religious & political events, etc.
  • Snapshots – you know… phone photos, family & friend photos, spontaneous (or even uncontrollable) presses of the shutter release… say cheese!

 

Animated framed portrait.ART 235 Photo Imaging: Creative Workflow is an art course. It's about learning to use photography for personal expression and strategies for managing your digital assets and your digital lifestyle. It's not about photo journalism, family photos, event photography, documenting your life here at Towson University, etc. Be creative! Explore new directions and your personal interests with this medium. You'll be able to apply everything you learn in this course to all of your future photographic needs.

George Eastman House presents…

The George Eastman House International Museum of Photography & Film, located in Rochester, NY, combines the world’s leading collections of photography and motion pictures with the National Historic Landmark mansion and gardens of Kodak founder George Eastman. Eastman is heralded as the father of popular photography and motion picture film.

Inventions of Photography – Photographic Processes Series

A short introduction about the history of photography by The George Eastman House, released December 2014. Video, 63:49 in 12 short parts.

Photograph of a hand holding a camera lens.

Factoid No. 9
Camera lenses are circular, but photographs are rectangular… believe it or not!

13 Mind-bending Thoughts About Photography

Photographer Matthew Rycroft put together this video containing 13 strange, random, and mind-bending “facts” about photography. These are short and seemingly obvious statements that may make you stop and think. Read more on PetaPixel…

Challenge One illustration.

Click image for larger version.

Challenge One

Three Shots (Auto)

Due: February 24th

Concept: Explore your camera while photographing a subject and interpreting the shot list.

 

Shot List

  • Shoot a coffee cup/mug with coffee in it (hint: include coffee in shot)
  • Shoot a coffee cup/mug without coffee in it
  • Shoot a coffee cup/mug so the audience can't tell what's in it

 

Shoot anything you want to further explore your camera – it's normal to shoot thousands of images during this course :)

Bring your camera, computer with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom installed and your digital files to the next class for processing.

Challenge Two illustration.

Click image for larger version.

Challenge Two

Twelve Shots (Manual Mode)

Due: March 3rd

Concept: Set up a still life and explore your camera's manual mode while shooting and interpreting the shot/task list.

Research still life photography in your favorite web browser for inspiration. Research other terms such as ISO, aperture or ƒ-stop, shutter speed and more to help you understand photography.

 

Shot/Task List (12 Shots / same subject)

  • Set your camera to it's lowest ISO (usually 100 or 200)
  • Select the largest ƒ-stop (as close to ƒ/2.8 as possible) on your lens
  • Meter the light to select the appropriate shutter speed and shoot
  • Select ƒ/8 on your lens
  • Meter the light to select the appropriate shutter speed and shoot
  • Select the smallest ƒ-stop (as close to ƒ/22 as possible) on your lens
  • Meter the light to select the appropriate shutter speed and shoot
  • Set your camera to ISO 800 and reshoot, adjusting the ƒ-stops as above and metering the light to select the appropriate shutter speed
  • Set your camera to ISO 3200 and reshoot, adjusting the ƒ-stops as above and metering the light to select the appropriate shutter speed
  • Set your camera to it's highest ISO and reshoot, adjusting the ƒ-stops as above and metering the light to select the appropriate shutter speed

 

Shoot anything you want to further explore your camera – it's normal to shoot thousands of images during this course :)

Bring your camera, computer with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom installed and your digital files to the next class for processing.

Challenge Two illustration.

Contact sheet of Sophia Loren by David Seymore. Click image for larger version.

 

 

ISO Quick Guide


ISO 100 or less – bright light situations

ISO 200 – bright light or open shade

ISO 400 – overcast or indoors

ISO 800 – low light situations, nighttime, concerts

ISO 1600 – low light situations, candlelight

ISO 3200 or greater – extreme low light situations, moon or star light

Low ISO values produce clear images. High ISO values produce image noise (film grain).

 

Explora – B&H Photo
News, Tips & Reviews about Photography

Learn more about exposure online…

ISO Explained – video, 04:10

Aperture – video, 06:03

Shutter Speed – video, 07:34

Challenge Three

One Hundred Eight Shots (Manual Mode & Exposure Bracket)

Due: March 10th

Concept: Portraiture – photograph a person, exploring your camera's manual mode and bracket your exposures while shooting and interpreting the shot/task list. Shoot the equivalent of three rolls of film for this challenge. Rolls of film typically contain 36 exposures, x 3 = 108 shots.

Exposure brackets usually consist of three exposures – a normal exposure, an over exposure and an under exposure. You'll take three exposures for each shot in this challenge.

Research portrait photography in your favorite web browser for inspiration. Research other terms such as contact sheets, exposure brackets, ISO, aperture or ƒ-stop, shutter speed and more to help you understand photography. Image results for contact sheets will mostly be of black & white photography – this is not a BW project.

 

Shot/Task List (108 Shots / same subject)

  • Set your camera to the appropriate ISO for the lighting situation (see ISO Quick Guide at left). You may vary the ISO during your shoot(s).
  • Meter the light to select the appropriate aperture & shutter speed and shoot – this is your normal exposure
  • Adjust the aperture or shutter speed to let 2x more light in than normal and shoot the over exposure
  • Adjust the aperture or shutter speed to let 1/2x less light in than normal and shoot the under exposure
  • Compose your next shot and repeat the normal, over and under exposures

 

Shoot anything you want to further explore photography – it's normal to shoot thousands of images during this course :)

Bring your camera, computer with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom installed and your digital files to the next class for processing.

egg with shadow

Project One

The Incredible Photogenic Egg: Study in Exposure & ISO

Due: March 17th

Concept: Set your camera to manual mode and photograph a still life with an egg as the main subject at ISOs 100*, 400, 800 and 3200, metering the light to get the best exposures and print your results.

* Use ISO 200 if that's the lowest ISO setting on your camera.

Project Brief: This is a study in exposure and what happens to your image quality when shooting at different ISO settings. Create a still life set up with an egg as the main subject or hero of the composition. Frame your composition, set the camera to manual mode, change the ISO to 100, meter the light and adjust the shutter speed and ƒ-stop to get the correct exposure. Switch the ISO to 400, 800 and 3200 and repeat. (Tip: you'll probably keep the ƒ-stop the same and simply change the shutter speed to compensate for the increased ISO sensitivity.) Feel free to unleash your creative beastie with the subject and your composition. Note: this is a color project, no BW images.

Extra credit star.Extra Credit: Stand the egg on it's end in your composition like the project illustration in the left sidebar for bonus points. Shoot additional sets of compositions for even more bonus points.

 

Getting Started:

  1. Set up your subject and anything else you want in your composition – remember, the egg is the hero,
  2. Light your subject, create interest with shadows – modify the light as necessary,
  3. Set your camera to the manual shooting mode and ISO to 100*,
  4. Aim your camera and frame the subject,
  5. Press the shutter release halfway to meter the exposure,
  6. Adjust the shutter speed and ƒ-stop for the best exposure,
  7. Press the shutter release to take the shot,
  8. Change the ISO to 400 and repeat steps 4–7 (see tip in Project Brief),
  9. Repeat with ISOs 800 and 3200,
  10. Import your images into Lightroom and make any necessary developments,
  11. Print your results on 8.5 x 11" paper, making the most of the 93.5 square inches of printing area – i.e. print as large as possible on the sheet of paper :)
  12. Bring your prints and files to the next class for additional processing and critique.

 

Shot & Task List

  • Still life with an egg as the main subject (the hero)
  • Shoot at ISOs 100*, 400, 800 & 3200
  • Import images into Lightroom & develop as necessary
  • Print on 8.5 x 11" paper
  • Bring your prints & gear to our next class for additional processing & critique
  • Be creative & have fun!

 

Tips and insight.

Shooting Sharp Photos…

  • Use a tripod, monopod or anything you can use to support you and your camera. Lean against a wall, railing, fence post, etc. If you're supported, your camera will be too. (Tripods available for check-out – see schedule on CA4006 or CA4010 doors for more information.)
  • Take care with focusing – auto focus is great, but sometimes you need to switch to manual focus to get the job done.
  • Try shooting at your lens' sweet spot – usually 2–3 ƒ-stops smaller than the widest (largest) aperture. All lenses are not created equal, so you have to experiment to find which aperture gives you the sharpest image for each of your lenses.
  • Use a cable release or your camera's self timer to trigger the shutter release instead of your finger to reduce camera shake (see your camera's user guide for info about your camera's self timer).
  • Brace your arms against your chest and hold your breath while hand-holding your camera – press the shutter release to take the shot and lift your finger in a smooth, fluid motion instead of awkwardly jerking your camera around.

 

Specifications (grading criteria – each worth 10% of total grade)
Content: 4 photos of subject at ISOs 100*, 400, 800 & 3200
Task: exploration of exposure & ISO, composition & creativity
File Properties (dimensions, resolution, color mode): executed in-class
Metadata: executed in-class (title, author, description, keywords, copyright status & notice, camera data)
File Format: executed in-class
Naming Convention: executed in-class (lowercase & hyphens)
Creativity: originality & inventiveness
Technical Skills: proficiency with software & hardware
Directions: adherence to instructions
Deadline: March 17th, bring your prints, gear & files to class for processing & critique

 

Special chracters: copyright, registered trademark and trademark symbols.

Special Characters
Copyright symbol (Option + G), Registered Trademark symbol (Option + R) and Trademark symbol (Option + 2) can all be easily typed on a Mac.

Bonus Tip

Twelve Must-know Mac OS Keyboard Shortcuts for Special Characters

Digital imaging pros know their computers inside and out, including their keyboards and important keyboard shortcuts for special characters to get the job done! The following 12 shortcuts are part of everyday keystrokes, worth memorizing to allow you to be productive and type like the pros!

Name Symbol Keys
Acute Accent (résumé) ´ Option + E (followed by key press for vowel)
Bullet Option + 8
Cents ¢ Option + 4
Copyright Symbol © Option + G
Degree Symbol (90 ˚F) ˚ Option + K
Ellipsis (She said she was a dancer…) Option + ; (semicolon)
Em Dash (long dash—width of an M) Option + Shift + - (hyphen)
En Dash (wide dash, width of an N: Monday–Friday, 6–9 pm) Option + - (hyphen)
Eñe (Spanish character with a tilde over n: año, El Niño) ñ Option + N (followed by N)
Italicized f in ƒ/stop ƒ Option + F
Registered Trademark (officially used to mark one's property) ® Option + R
Trademark (unregistered, used to mark one's property) Option + 2

 

Double-bonus Tip: Links to additional Apple and Windows special characters.

Triple-bonus Tip: Use the menu,  > System Preferences… and select Keyboard in the second row to enable the Keyboard and Character Viewers in menu bar. You'll be able to use the Keyboard Viewer to see where special characters live on the keyboard so you can type them and the Character Viewer to select and insert special characters into your documents!

Quadruple-bonus Tip: The Apple icon () can be typed using Option + Shift + K (not available in all fonts).